A Glance at Glasgow’s Legend Life History, Alastair Borthwick

Born in Rutherglen and raised partially in two other towns, Troon and Glasgow, Alastair Borthwick is a man whose legacy lies strongly in the two books that he authored before he passed away on 25th September 2003. Alastair was born on 17th Feb 1913 and was an alumnus of Glasgow High School. He left high school at the age of sixteen and immediately began working at the Glasgow Herald in 1929, and since then, his life revolved around the media.

His first job involved taking down copies from correspondents phoning in the Glasgow Herald before he was promoted as the editor of some of the Herald’s pages. Since then, he never looked back and continued to involve himself with journalism even more. It is while serving as an editor that Alastair Borthwick came across and became heavily involved with the town’s hillwalking and climbing arena.

For another six years, Alastair served as editor before moving to work at Daily Mirror in London. However, life was not appealing to him, and after a while, he moved back to Glasgow where he joined BBC as a radio correspondent. After a few years at BBC, Borthwick finally published some of his work, entitled; Always A Little Further, under a publisher known as Faber. The publication was just one of the many pieces he had authored while working at Glasgow Herald. Even though the publishers were unsure on whether to publish, they proceeded with the action because the print received a lot of appreciation. Since then, the book has been published and remains one of the best books that has ever been written about Scotland’s outdoor activities.

When the Second World War began, Alastair joined in as an intelligence officer for the Seaforth Highlanders, a squad that participated in the war in various parts of the world such as Holland, Germany, North Africa and many other parts of the continent. As per WikiVisually, when the storm finally came down, and calmness returned, Alastair was requested to write about his squad’s history, and it was later published under the title, Sans Peur, the history of the 5th battalion the Seaforth highlanders.

After the war ended, he finally moved to Jura with his wife and continued working for BBC. In the early 1950’s, Borthwick moved again this time to Islay, and after a while, he went back to Glasgow. However, five years before he passed away, Alastair Borthwick had been living in a nursing home in Beith.

Reference: https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7954898/alastair-borthwick

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